Albert Trott

Country: England
Born: February 06, 1873, Abbotsford, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Batting Style: Right hand Bat
Bowling Style: Right arm Slow
Died: July 30, 1914, Willesden Green, Middlesex, (aged 41y 174d)

Albert Trott Bio

Albert Edwin Trott, born on February 6, 1873, in Melbourne, Australia, was a cricket player who left an indelible mark on the sport. Despite his remarkable talent and achievements, Trott’s legacy has been overshadowed by tragedy and neglect. Hailing from a cricketing family, with his brother G. H. S. (Harry) already making waves in the Australian cricket scene, Trott was destined to excel in the sport.

Trott burst into prominence during the 1894-95 Test series against England, where he showcased his extraordinary skills as both a batsman and a bowler. In the Adelaide Test, he scored 38 and 72 not out, while also taking eight wickets for just 43 runs. His performance in that series, including an unbeaten 85 at Sydney, propelled him to the top of the batting averages for Australia against England, with an impressive average of 102.5.

Despite his stellar performance, Trott was inexplicably left out of Australia’s tour to England in 1896. Undeterred, he traveled to England independently and caught the attention of Middlesex County Cricket Club. Trott’s all-round abilities, powerful batting, and versatile bowling made him an asset to the team. In 1899, he achieved a significant milestone by hitting M. A. Noble over the Lord’s pavilion. That year, Trott scored over 1,000 runs and took 239 wickets. He continued his remarkable form in 1900, solidifying his reputation as one of the greatest all-round cricketers in the world. In that season, he scored 1,337 runs and took 211 wickets.

Trott’s bowling style, characterized by a round-arm delivery, was known for its variety and unpredictability. His ability to switch between a fast ball and a slower, deceptive delivery made him a formidable opponent. However, as the seasons progressed, Trott’s performance began to decline. He struggled with health issues, including the effects of excessive drinking and dropsy, which ultimately led to melancholia.

In 1910, Trott transitioned to becoming an umpire, but his health further deteriorated, and he found himself in a state of despair. On July 30, 1914, Trott tragically took his own life at his lodgings in Denbigh Road, Willesden Green. His death marked the end of a career that could have been even more illustrious had it not been for his untimely decline.

Despite the dark turn of his life, Trott’s contributions to the sport of cricket should not be forgotten. He was a pioneering figure, becoming the first batsman to hit a ball over the present pavilion at Lord’s in 1899, off the bowling of Noble. His fielding skills were equally impressive, with his large hands rarely allowing a catch to slip through.

The legacy of Albert Edwin Trott is one of immense potential and tragic endings. His brief but brilliant career as an all-round cricketer continues to captivate cricket enthusiasts and serves as a reminder of the fragility of human existence. Trott’s name may have fallen into neglect, but his impact on the sport should never be overlooked or underestimated.

Albert Trott Career Stats

Albert Trott Batting Stats

Batting Matches Innings Nos Runs High Score Ave BF SR 100s 50s 4s 6s Ct St
Tests 5 9 3 228 85* 38 - - 0 2 - 1 4 0
T20Is - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
ODIs - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
FC 375 602 53 10696 164 19.48 - - 8 44 - - 452 0
List A - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
T20s - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Albert Trott Bowling Stats

Bowling Matches Innings Balls Runs Wkts BBI BBM Ave Econ SR 4w 5w 10w
Tests 5 8 948 390 26 8/43 9/110 15 2.46 36.4 3 2 0
T20Is - - - - - - - - - - - - -
ODIs - - - - - - - - - - - - -
FC 375 - 71549 35318 1674 10/42 - 21.09 2.96 42.7 - 131 41
List A - - - - - - - - - - - - -
T20s - - - - - - - - - - - - -

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